Saturday, 11 August 2018

Levi Jackson's Rag, memories from Annette Dwight

Click on pictures for full-screen image

In the Folk Revival period of the seventies Bush Dancing became very popular.

Frank Canty started the first Balmain Bush Dance at the Town Hall in 1978 with 2 to 3
sets of people and by the end of the year it was so crowded that it was hard to get in
the door and on the 12th August 1978 the first Bush Music Club Subscription Ball was
held at Ashfield Town Hall. 

Arising from this I was invited by Frank Canty to attend a meeting at Bankstown to
form the Sydney Colonial Dancers as a performance dance group. Practices were
initially held at the Tritton Hall in Marrickville up until 1981 and then when I took over
the running of the€ group the practice venue moved to St James Hall at Glebe.

The Sydney Colonial Dancers performed every year at the€ National Folkloric Festival
in the Concert Hall at the Opera house and did outdoor performances on a Sunday
afternoon in the Opera House forecourt. Much fun was also had performing at the
Rocks, Sydney Town Hall and at Folk Festivals.

In 1982 a tall, lanky American visited the Sydney Colonials at our Tuesday night
practices. He was on an extended holiday Down Under and shared our enthusiasm for
dancing. He was keen to learn our repertoire of dances and reciprocated by teaching us
Levi Jackson's Rag. This was completely new to the folk scene in Sydney at the time
and quickly became one of the most popular dances. Now 36 years later it is even
more popular than ever, being included on the dance program of any bush dances
across Australia.




In 1982 the National Folk Festival was held at Sydney University and Bryden Allen
ambitiously got together a group of dancers to perform the marathon dance The
Running Set.
The lanky American who taught us Levi Jackson's Rag joined us and
can be seen in the following photographs with his long baggy red pants, dark hair and
beard. We danced until we dropped.



I'm sure€ that he would be pleased to know that we still remember the contribution that
he made and the great dance he gifted to us.



The photos show the group who performed The Running Set at the National
Folk Festival in 1982. In the foreground I am the lady in the yellow skirt and white
blouse dancing with the tall American in red pants. Others who can be seen include
Bryden Allen, Paul Weaver, Vernon Verass and Alan Phillips




 Article
© Annette Dwight, photos from Annette Dwight collection

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Monday, 6 August 2018

Bush Music Club Preamble & Constitution, 2-5-61

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Another find from the Archives, another foolscap page scanned in 2 images.

 




 
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Wednesday, 1 August 2018

Posters for Keith Hollinshead's shows found on the walls of Tritton Hall.

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1.



2.




3.


4.


4.


5.   Saturday 18th April 1987


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Wednesday, 11 July 2018

Duke's Place Australian Songs in Concert & Session with Russell Churcher, Friday 14th September, 7.30 for 8pm


Bush Music Club  
Tritton Hall, Hut 44
Addison Road Centre
142 Addison Road, Marrickville
 





Russell’s first festival performance was as a lead soloist in Peter Bellamy’s folk opera The Transports at the 1988 National Folk Festival. Since then he has performed at countless country halls and pubs from Port Macquarie to Mungindi.

Russell has supported touring performers such as Foster and Allen, Jimmy Little and John Williamson and has performed in front of the Prince of Wales, The Duke Of York and many other well-known hotels.

For a number of years he was resident entertainer, penny-farthing cyclist and shingle-splitter at Timbertown theme park Wauchope.

In recent times he has performed with Dave de Santi in the duo 'Rusty and The Saint' at the Illawarra Folk Festival, Folk by the Sea Kiama and the Peak Festival Perisher.


usually 2nd Fridays February to December, 7.30 for 8pm start - concert is followed by a session $10, bring a contribution for supper  


enquiries Sandra 9358 4886 

www.bushmusic.org.au
http://bushmusicclub.blogspot.com.au/



Map of Addison Road Centre     http://www.arcco.org.au/contact/


Duke's place, named after our honoured early member Harold 'Duke' Tritton (1886-1965), is the place to go once a month for a great night of Australian songs in concert and session. Duke was a powerful singer who supplied BMC with many songs he had learnt in his younger days while working as a shearer and at other bush jobs. He was also a songwriter and poet giving us songs that have entered the tradition such as Sandy Hollow Line and Shearing in the Bar.







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Duke's Place Australian Songs in Concert & Session with Matthew Black & The Bottlers, Friday 10th August, 7.30 for 8pm

Bush Music Club  
Tritton Hall, Hut 44
Addison Road Centre
142 Addison Road, Marrickville 



$10, BYO, bring a contribution for supper 


The Bottlers are a hard playing, nine piece, all acoustic folk punk band hailing from Sydney, Australia. Drawing life breath from not only the traditionally folk fuelled rural reaches of the nation but also it’s cityscapes and suburban streets with a solid tip of the hat to the folk, punk and folk punk pioneers that have traipsed and trekked the trails well before them.



The Bottlers believe folk based music should progressively speak of the times it exists in whilst hearkening back to it’s past, to the true heart of folk music, people. Because you truly can’t get where you’re going till you know where you’ve been.

Folk music should speak of the times it’s written in while hearkening back to the past, reckon The Bottlers. It’s something of yourself that others can dance to. It’s a conversation. It’s a lot of other things, too, but maybe most importantly – and by definition – it’s people. All kinds.

“We’ve played to punk crowds, metal crowds, folk festival crowds – which can be an older generation of people,” explains Matthew Black, the band’s founder and vocalist.

“Some people it shocks the socks and sandals off, but at the same time some people really embrace it.”

The band’s broad influences, authentic western Sydney twang and infectious larrikinism mean they’re equally at home at a scuzzy punk show or a rustic country pub. You might or might not detect influences like the Dropkick Murphys, Redgum or Billy Bragg, but buggered if you don’t get drawn in by the yarns, the energy and the playful mix of personalities all crammed up there on stage.

The Bottlers got going in earnest about three years ago when Ned McPhie and Black teamed up. The two started trying to cobble into songs what Black had committed to a collection of notebooks.

“You write about what you know and if a bit of western suburbs confliction gets the ink scraping across the paper, then that helps the job along,” says Black of what started to come together, and became the track “Blacktown” on the band’s demo release.

“We then started collecting the menagerie of members we have now. We didn’t mean to make it that large a group, but that’s how it panned out.”

And collect they certainly did. The folk-punk outfit is now nine members strong, with vocals, fiddle, drums, guitars, tin whistle, bass, accordion, mandolin, and banjo in the mix. Shows have even been known to feature a lagerphone.


Duke Tritton, by Hottie Lahm, 1959.

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Duke's Place - Australian songs in concert & session

usually 2nd Fridays, 7.30 for 8pm start
- concert is followed by a session



enquiries Sandra 9358 4886 

www.bushmusic.org.au
http://bushmusicclub.blogspot.com.au/



Map of Addison Road Centre     http://www.arcco.org.au/contact/



Duke's place, named after our honoured early member Harold 'Duke' Tritton (1886-1965), is the place to go once a month for a great night of Australian songs in concert and session. Duke was a powerful singer who supplied BMC with many songs he had learnt in his younger days while working as a shearer and at other bush jobs. He was also a songwriter and poet giving us songs that have entered the tradition such as Sandy Hollow Line and Shearing in the Bar.

Sunday, 1 July 2018

Moondyne Joe and other Sandgroper Ballads (1969) by L.G. Montgomery

Click on pictures for full-screen image
 

From the Archives - Three letters from Mr L. G. Montgomery (aka Sandgroper) received by Editor Dale Dengate in 1969 and 1970.

In April 1969 Western Australian member Mr L. G. Montgomery renewed his membership and enclosed copies of 2 songsheets he had published - Moondyne Joe and other Sandgroper Ballads, and The Wildflower Songsheet of Australian Ballads. 

The Moondyne Joe songsheet was also sent to the Victorian Folk Music Club where two songs were published in the December 1969 edition of Australian Tradition and credited to the Perth Bush Music Club. 


(All songs © LG Montgomery aka Sandgroper)



1.

 
2.

3. 

In the Bush Music Club newsletter the Songsheets were credited to LG Montgomery, the "Sandgroper"


4.

The Victorian Folk Music Club published two songs from the Moondyne Joe Songsheet in the December 1969 issue of their journal Australian Tradition, crediting them to the Perth Bush Music Club. Thanks to the Victorian Folk Music Club for permission to reproduce these pages

5.  


6. 

The folder came in 2 colours, and both contained an extra song.

8.  The folders contained words & music for
Moondyne Joe, Canning Stock Route, Down in The Gold Mine and  Coast of New Holland. They also included a single songsheet - The Ballad of Ned Kelly (green cover) and The Canning Stockroute (black cover) and were accompanied by a smaller publication The Wildflower Songsheet.



9.


9.

 
10.

  (BMC Archives)


11.
State Library of Western Australia catalogue entry for Moondyne Joe, with incomplete citation.

12. State Library of Western Australia catalogue entry for The Wildflower Songsheet, with incomplete citation.



13.  Letter, 27th November 1969, accompanied by 4 songsheets


14.



15. Down in the Goldmine, version date 27th November 1969


16.



17.


18.



20.   Letter dated 14th May, 1970



21. Canning Stock route,
version dated 14th May 1970

22. 
Down in the Goldmine, version dated 14th May 1970

23.

(BMC Archives) 

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Tuesday, 26 June 2018

John Dengate Political Songwriting Competition, Gulgong Folk Festival, 2017

Click on pictures for full-screen image
 

The winner was Derek Dowding with his excellent parody Mr Minister to the tune of Mr Piano Man by Billy Joel

Thanks to the Di Clifford of the Gulgong Folk Festival committee for obtaining permission from Derek for us to publish it.





 




 ....................................

Winners of Illawarra Folk Festival's John and Dale Dengate Parody mug, 2014 to date

John & Dale Dengate Parody Competition, Illawarra Folk Festival, 2014 to 2017


Dale & John Dengate Parody Mug, Illawarra Folk Festival 2018



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Thursday, 21 June 2018

Duke Tritton - Tritton family documents published with permission.

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Thanks to Don Tritton (son of Duke's youngest son Don) and Chris McLean (son of Duke's daughter, Linda McLean) for providing these copies, and to Dr Diane Bull (daughter of Linda) and Literary Executor of her Grandfather and her Mother for permission to publish their writings.

In 1959 The Bulletin published Duke's autobiography, Time Means Tucker, and in 1982 APCOL published Linda McLean's biography Pumpkin Pie and Faded Sandshoes. Both books are available in Libraries across Australia.




Time Means Tucker has been reprinted several times and is also available in the second-hand market, but Linda's biography has never been reprinted and is a very rare book and not currently available on the Australian second-hand market.

Pumpkin Pie and Faded Sandshoes starts with the story of the Tritton family in the 20s and 30s.
Linda was 19 with a toddler and baby in 1937 when her husband got his first full time job, as a labourer on a large project. Her father was also employed on this project, and leaving her toddler with her mother, the 3 of them (& baby) set out to  Sandy Hollow, the subject of one of Duke's most powerful songs.



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1. Review of Four Capitals Folk Song concerts


2.Review of Four Capitals Folk Singers


3. Review of Time Means Tucker, Country Life, Jan 29, 1965


4.  Letter from Russel Ward, Uni of New England


5. Information on Australian Folk Arts Centre activities


6.  Information on Folk Arts Australia, the magazine of Australian Folk Arts Centre


7. Letter dated Friday 14th February 1964 from Australian Broadcasting Commission inviting Duke to appear on Town and Country program in a segment on gold panning, for a fee of £6.



8. Letter from Golden Press, Shakespeare Head Press
dated 17th July 1963, regarding delayed publication of Time Means Tucker.


9. Letter from Paul Hamlyn publishers to Linda McLean regarding reprint of Bill Scott's Book of Australian Folklore which includes an extract from Time Means Tucker.  (blurry photo)


10. Biographical note
with word play by Duke.

from Diane Bull

I was very close to my grandparents as they lived with us for the last twenty or so years of their lives. I typed all my grandfather's manuscripts and much of my mother's work. This piece of writing with encryptions at the bottom shows my grandfather's habit of using any piece of paper several times. The paper was a practice copy of his writings; he would do several copies prior to giving them initially to my Aunty May and in his later writings to me to type up.
The writings at the bottom were for his daily penchant for doing the anagram puzzles from the newspaper.
I would often do these puzzles with him and this has left me with a lifelong addiction to cryptic puzzles.


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