Monday, 26 September 2016

Duke's Place - Australian songs in Concert & Session with Don & Sue Brian, Friday 11th November, 2016













Don Brian has been singing for his own enjoyment for 40 years and sometimes for others in groups such as the Tin Shed Rattlers, the Roaring Forties and Southern Cross Trawlers. A collector of oral history, folksong and folklore, he has recently returned from taking a folk history tour to Norfolk Island where he and wife Sue have been researching the colonial  history and whaling industry. Sue has learned the skills of traditional hat making from Norfolk islanders, Wayne Boniface and Greg Magri, who are passing on these traditional techniques. The methods are similar to the making of the cabbage tree hats and Sue is hoping to revive this art that appears to have died out on mainland Australia.



At Duke's Place Don and Sue Brian will be presenting the traditional Craft of Cabbage tree hat making along with a visual presentation of its history and a surprising number of songs that relate to this fashionable attire from the 1790s up until the depression of the 1930s. There will be some hands on involvement for those who wish to learn what is involved in this historic folk craft.





Sue's hats

In the second part of the program Don will present some songs from his research on Norfolk Island including newly discovered convict songs recorded in diaries at the time.






 

Bush Music Club Tritton Hall Hut 44 Addison Road Centre 142 Addison Rd, Marrickville

Map of Addison Road Centre http://www.arcco.org.au/contact/

Door opens 7.30 for 8pm start. Session 10.00-11.30pm
BYO songs
Cost - $10
Bring something to drink & a plate for supper
Enquiries - Sandra 9358 4886

Duke's place, named after our honoured early member Harold 'Duke' Tritton (1886-1965), is the place to go once a month for a great night of Australian songs in concert and session. Duke was a powerful singer who supplied BMC with many songs he had learnt in his younger days while working as a shearer and at other bush jobs. He was also a songwriter and poet giving us songs that have entered the tradition such as Sandy Hollow Line and Shearing in the Bar.





 




Photos - Sandra Nixon

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Sunday, 18 September 2016

How to build a lagerphone by Brian Loughlin 1956






Drawing by Gill Small of Brian & his lagerphone, cover of Singabout 1(2), Autumn 1956.



Build a lagerphone ... by Brian Loughlin,
lagerphonist with The Bushwhackers.
Singabout 1(3) Winter 1956, page 23,

 



The Bushwhackers have performed Australian songs and ballads for just about every conceivable type of audience, and with each performance comes enquiries about the band's percussion section - in particular, the lagerphone, and how to construct and play the instrument.


Brian Loughlin singing, with Alex Hood playing his lagerphone, Singabout 1(3), page 12.


We discovered the lagerphone (local name) in use in Holbrook, N.S.W., in 1953 and since then research has told us that use of the instrument in early Australia was popular, possibly being introduced by ex-members of the British Army.



Claude Meredith's lagerphone 1953, from the collection of Holbrook Museum. (BMC archives)



Drawing by Bob Bolton (BMC archives)


Until about the turn of the century, England's military bands had in use a percussion instrument known as Jingling Johnnie, and this may be said to be the parent of our lagerphone, which has other names in different localities. Jingling Johnnie consisted of a metal rod with two or three cross-pieces and a "pagoda" top. The lot covered with the jingles from tambourines, and shaken and beaten to provide rhythm.



Tha parentage of Jingling Johnnie may be traced back through Europe (where it has left branches of its family in many countries) to Turkey. Back as far as the 1300's the Turks had a percussion instrument known as the "Crescent", which played a prominent part in all their music, particularly military music. The Turkish Crescent was an elaborate affair, often made of precious metals and adorned with gems. Not so the lagerphone, traditionally made from any materials at hand.



Here's a rough description of how the Bushwhacker's model is constructed. The cork lining is removed from about 300 bottle tops, (lager by choice!) and each of these is pierced by driving a six-inch nail through it's centre. Three-quarter inch clouts are then used to loosely attach the bottle tops, inside out, to a broom stick, complete with head (hair removed). A rubber crutch grip covers the bottom end of the stick and provides "bounce" and protection for polished floors. A clear space is left on the stick just under the head as a hand grip, and another about six inches lower down for the free contact of the rattle stick. Apart from the bottle tops, as many adornments and noise-makers may be added as desired.



The rattle stick, which appears to be an Australian innovation is made from an eighteen inch strip of hard-wood, fashioned into a handle at one end. Edges of the rattle stick are serrated, so that as it is drawn across the lagerphone th sound of massed tambourines shatters the silence! Alternate bowing and tapping with the rattle stick, accompanied by the bouncing of the instrument on its rubber grip on the floor provides any desired rhythm.



The appearance of the lagerphone and it's fascination to audiences can easily lead players into error. The instrument is not solely meant to make people laugh, but is intended as a serious rhythm accompaniment to melody instruments.



In ten minutes, anyone can play a lagerphone and that's one reason why there are so many about now; but for a really polished style and full satisfaction from performances, you must treat your lagerphone as you would any other musical instrument. Practice regularly and listen to other players' styles and effects.



If you haven't got a lagerphone, make one this weekend. They are good fun ... and remember the Bushwhackers' slogan "A lagerphone in every home."


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Saturday, 17 September 2016

Duke's Place - Australian Songs in Concert & Session with Martyn Wyndham-Read, Saturday 8th October 2016




For this month only, Dukes will be held on a Saturday to fit in with Martyn's touring schedule



Martyn Wyndham-Read 


Download some of Martyn's early albums here




Martyn knew Duke as they were part of the Four Capitals Tour in 1964, & as he wrote, t'will be an honour to play at Duke's Hall.

Martyn (photo supplied)

English by birth, Martyn first developed his great interest in folksongs of the outback when he went to Australia in the early 1960's. There, while working on the South Australian sheep station Emu Springs, he gained first hand experience of life as a bush worker and at the same time fell in love with Australia and it's music.


Danny Spooner & Martyn  (BMC archives)

During his subsequent travels he spent much of his time seeking out and learning old songs directly from drovers, cane cutters and other bush workers. As the folk song revival gathered pace in Australia, Martyn found himself singing these songs to audiences all across the Australian continent and after seven years down under, he returned to England where he performed these songs to an appreciative British audience. Concert tours spreading his style of music to the far corners of the world have been the norm since then. Martyn has been involved in the folk scene for over 50 years and has released more than 30 albums, many considered classics of their genre. One of the most engaging performers you're ever likely to see, his exceptionally intimate performance combines songs, humorous bush poetry recitations, stories and anecdotes of outback life and comments on Australian history and culture.

Martyn has not appeared at the Bush Music Club since the 90s.

He appeared at the Loaded Dog Folk Club last year supported by BMC member Claire Doherty


Claire & Martyn - (Naomi Doherty photo)

Bush Music Club
Tritton Hall
Hut 44 Addison Road Centre
142 Addison Rd, Marrickville

Map of Addison Road Centre http://www.arcco.org.au/contact/


Door opens 7.30 for 8pm start. Session 10.00-11.30pm

BYO songs
Cost - $10
Bring something to drink & a plate for supper
Enquiries - Sandra 9358 4886

Duke's place, named after our honoured early member Harold 'Duke' Tritton (1886-1965), is the place to go once a month for a great night of Australian songs in concert and session. Duke was a powerful singer who supplied BMC with many songs he had learnt in his younger days while working as a shearer and at other bush jobs. He was also a songwriter and poet giving us songs that have entered the tradition such as Sandy Hollow Line and Shearing in the Bar.





Next concert - Friday 11th November - Don Brian


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Wake for Alan Scott, 1930-1995





Biography & description of the Scott collection in National  Library Oral History Collection



   
Gay & Alan Scott (courtesy of Jane & Bill Scott)



Photos taken at the Scott house, possibly celebrating Alan's life. He does not appear in the photos.  (BMC archives, unknown photographer)


Thanks to Dale Dengate & Ann & Frank Maher for help with identification of people in the photos.

  
1.  Tania de Santi,
Brian van der Plaat, Helen Golak (nee Maher), Patricia Early seated
 


2. Seamus Gill, Col McJannett


3.Alan Phillips 


4.

5. Seamus Gill, Kevin Baker
 
6. Seamus Gill, Kevin Baker,
 
7.  Tania de Santi, Fran Scott, Ashley Scott, Gay Scott, unidentified, Bill Scott, Seamus Gill


8.  Bob Bolton



9. Alan Phillips, John Dengate, Brian Dunnett.

.
10. Keith McKenry leaning on wall, Maher grandson, Dave de Santi


11. Denis Kevans

12. Frank Maher, Dale Dengate, Bob Bolton, Bill Scott, Seamus Gill, Beth Muntz, Denis Kevans, Brad Tate, Ann Maher & Helen Golak (nee Maher)


13. Frank & Ann Maher, Keith McKenry, Brad Tate, Kevin Baker, Dave de Santi, Elizabeth Maher,




14. Frank & Ann Maher, Keith McKenry, Brad Tate, Kevin Baker


 
16. front - Margaret Walters, Len Neary



17. Brian Dunnett, Maureen Chapman, Chris Kempster



18. Dave de Santi, Frank Canty, Gay Scott



19. Frank & Ann Maher, Keith McKenry, Kevin Baker





20. Rita Hufton, Beth Muntz, Elizabeth Maher, Brad Tate, Brian van der Plaat, Helen Golak & son David, Tania De Santi, Len Neary


21. Maureen Chapman, Chris Kempster, Ulladulla.



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Monday, 5 September 2016

POETRY anyone? Enjoy reciting a poem? Sharing a poem with others?




New BMC activity, Saturdays, 2pm to 4pm - Aug 13, Sept 10, Oct 8 and Nov 12



POETRY anyone? Enjoy reciting a poem? Sharing a poem with others? 
 
Perhaps writing your own poems? Brushing up on performing some ‘bush’ poetry? If so, you are very welcome to come along. 


Where: The BMC Hut at Marrickville, Addison Rd.

Cost: $5 or gold coin donation. A contribution to go with afternoon tea would be appreciated. 


Contact: Karen Fong, (02) 9716 9660 (a message can be left) 


A few examples of poems & recitations published in BMC"s first journal, Singabout (1956 to 1967)





Singabout 3(1), 1958, page 14
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




Singabout 3(2), page 16, 1959

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Singabout 4(45), 1962

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Thursday, 1 September 2016

Report on Saplings Masterclass August 2016





The Masterclass started early for 2 families from the Hunter who stayed on Saturday night. Special thanks to those who helped set up & vacuumed the floors on Sunday.



(photo Doug Vincent)



Session before bed (Doug Vincent photo)


 Bush Music Festival 1982, the last time we had people sleeping in the Hut. (BMC archives)




Tutors - Beck Richmond, Vanessa Lockwood, Chris Poleson, Tony Romeo, Helen Romeo, Dave Johnson
Thanks also to Steve, George, Narelle and Doug & the Vincent family who set up chairs & vacuumed!

 

  




  









Beck's group

  


Vanessa'a group







Verandah music









(Doug Vincent photo)




George & Beck





Dave




Spoons lesson from Helen





  
Beck's tune writing workshop



 


Lunch!


Concert (Doug Vincent photo)



(Photos Sandra Nixon unless otherwise indicated)


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